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the Media vs the Net; Who you really mad at?
Topic Started: Dec 15 2016, 01:06 AM (4,512 Views)
Sammy
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We keep listening to thee blame game. Can it be that you don't really need the main stream media.
And who's in control, Russia? :popcorn:


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George Aligator
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Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
Death to the enemies among us! Pity is treason
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Sammy
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George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
We're trying to grasp what you're trying to tell us of these two people and of today.......

History forms many principals, and the directions....... So explain.... :popcorn: Sammy


Robber Baron was a term applied to a businessman in the 19th century who engaged in unethical and monopolistic practices, wielded widespread political influence, and amassed enormous wealth.

The term itself dated back centuries, and was originally applied to noblemen in the Middle Ages who functioned as feudal warlords and were literally “robber barons.”

In the 1870s the term began to be used to describe business tycoons, and the usage persisted throughout the rest of the 19th century. The late 1800s and the first decade of the 20th century is sometimes referred to as an age of robber barons.

http://history1800s.about.com/od/1800sglossary/g/Robber-Baron-definition.htm


A Brief History of Jim Crow

“I can ride in first-class cars on the railroads and in the streets,” wrote journalist T. McCants Stewart. “I can stop in and drink a glass of soda and be more politely waited upon than in some parts of New England.” Perhaps Stewart’s comments don’t seem newsworthy. Consider that he was reporting from South Carolina in 1885 and he was black Stewart had decided to tour the South because he feared for freedmen’s liberties. In 1868, with Amendment XIV, the Constitution had finally given black men full citizenship and promised them equal protection under the law. Blacks voted, won elected office, and served on juries. However, 10 years later, federal troops withdrew from the South, returning it to local white rule. And now, the Republican Party, champion of Reconstruction and freedmen’s rights, had fallen from national power. Would black people’s rights survive?


http://www.crf-usa.org/black-history-month/a-brief-history-of-jim-crow



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Sammy
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:nana: :rotflmao: :booboo: Sammy





Edited by Sammy, Dec 21 2016, 11:21 PM.
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_g R_
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Isn't there a place for retarded posts like this ?
Mentally disturbed board maybe ?
The U.S. government can't cover this up by imprisoning or murdering me. Truth is coming, and it cannot be stopped.
Edward Snowden
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_g R_
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This is not playtime.
The U.S. government can't cover this up by imprisoning or murdering me. Truth is coming, and it cannot be stopped.
Edward Snowden
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_g R_
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Sorry Sammy.
:cheers:

Clint Eastwood just rubs me the wrong way lately I guess.

Anyway
. Merry Christmas !
The U.S. government can't cover this up by imprisoning or murdering me. Truth is coming, and it cannot be stopped.
Edward Snowden
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Sammy
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_g R_
Dec 24 2016, 12:34 AM
Sorry Sammy.
:cheers:

Clint Eastwood just rubs me the wrong way lately I guess.

Anyway
. Merry Christmas !
no problem MerryChristmas :usa: Sammy
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Sammy
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:rotflmao:



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_g R_
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Posted Image
The U.S. government can't cover this up by imprisoning or murdering me. Truth is coming, and it cannot be stopped.
Edward Snowden
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Sammy
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George Aligator
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Sammy
Dec 20 2016, 02:56 AM
George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
We're trying to grasp what you're trying to tell us of these two people and of today.......

History forms many principals, and the directions....... So explain.... :popcorn: Sammy


Robber Baron was a term applied to a businessman in the 19th century who engaged in unethical and monopolistic practices, wielded widespread political influence, and amassed enormous wealth.

The term itself dated back centuries, and was originally applied to noblemen in the Middle Ages who functioned as feudal warlords and were literally “robber barons.”

In the 1870s the term began to be used to describe business tycoons, and the usage persisted throughout the rest of the 19th century. The late 1800s and the first decade of the 20th century is sometimes referred to as an age of robber barons.

http://history1800s.about.com/od/1800sglossary/g/Robber-Baron-definition.htm


A Brief History of Jim Crow

“I can ride in first-class cars on the railroads and in the streets,” wrote journalist T. McCants Stewart. “I can stop in and drink a glass of soda and be more politely waited upon than in some parts of New England.” Perhaps Stewart’s comments don’t seem newsworthy. Consider that he was reporting from South Carolina in 1885 and he was black Stewart had decided to tour the South because he feared for freedmen’s liberties. In 1868, with Amendment XIV, the Constitution had finally given black men full citizenship and promised them equal protection under the law. Blacks voted, won elected office, and served on juries. However, 10 years later, federal troops withdrew from the South, returning it to local white rule. And now, the Republican Party, champion of Reconstruction and freedmen’s rights, had fallen from national power. Would black people’s rights survive?


http://www.crf-usa.org/black-history-month/a-brief-history-of-jim-crow



I suppose another way to present what I'm trying to tell you is to look at the history of American history, the way that Americans tell the story of America. Everyone who undertakes to tell the story of America has a point of view and point to make. The most common point is the superiority of America to every other country on Earth. This is the origin of American exceptionalism, an idea rooted in Protestant Christianity and subsequently invoked to support rejection of modern progressive democracy and social justice as well as wars of aggression.

The critical years in the American story as regards American exceptionalism are in the period of our Civil War and Reconstruction, roughly speaking the decade from 1860 to 1870. These were also years of civil war and reconstruction in Europe, resulting in the new nations of Germany and Italy. It was in these years that the modern industrial democracies of the West assumed the shape they have even to this day.

This upheaval gave rise to modern parliamentary democracy in Europe and our two-party "democratic republic" in the United States. American exceptionalism tells us that our democracy is better than anybody else's and that our system is the envy of the world. This claim is demonstrably bullsh!t and blind acceptance of the arrogant boast is the mechanism which allows US voters to be herded like sheep by a government system less accountable to its citizens than the European model.
Death to the enemies among us! Pity is treason
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Eddo26
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George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
There will always be bias in free press, from the way the DNC spread fake news about Bernie during the primaries, and the way the Dems are complaining about Russia and Wikileaks influence in the general election.
We believe only what we want to believe.
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George Aligator
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Eddo36
Jan 20 2017, 09:33 PM
George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
There will always be bias in free press, from the way the DNC spread fake news about Bernie during the primaries, and the way the Dems are complaining about Russia and Wikileaks influence in the general election.
We agree that there will always be bias in the press. Most newspapers are quite explicit about their editorial views and endorsements. This aspect of the printed news has never been a problem for voters.

Radio and TV are another story. These news media are not covered by the First Amendment and, because federal license is required, came under the FCC which viewed licensed broadcasters as a public utility, required to be impartial or open to all points of view under the Fairness Doctrine. The Reagan administration struck down the Fairness Doctrine and gave rise to shrill and increasingly partisan radio and TV programming.

The original meaning of "free press" was a press open to all points of view. That has been lost and with it the provision of necessary information needed for citizens in a democracy.
Death to the enemies among us! Pity is treason
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Eddo26
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George Aligator
Jan 21 2017, 03:22 PM
Eddo36
Jan 20 2017, 09:33 PM
George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
There will always be bias in free press, from the way the DNC spread fake news about Bernie during the primaries, and the way the Dems are complaining about Russia and Wikileaks influence in the general election.
We agree that there will always be bias in the press. Most newspapers are quite explicit about their editorial views and endorsements. This aspect of the printed news has never been a problem for voters.

Radio and TV are another story. These news media are not covered by the First Amendment and, because federal license is required, came under the FCC which viewed licensed broadcasters as a public utility, required to be impartial or open to all points of view under the Fairness Doctrine. The Reagan administration struck down the Fairness Doctrine and gave rise to shrill and increasingly partisan radio and TV programming.

The original meaning of "free press" was a press open to all points of view. That has been lost and with it the provision of necessary information needed for citizens in a democracy.
And what about Facebook, Twitter, the whole internet? Should those not be covered by the 1st Amendment either?
We believe only what we want to believe.
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Sammy
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Eddo36
Jan 22 2017, 03:09 PM
George Aligator
Jan 21 2017, 03:22 PM
Eddo36
Jan 20 2017, 09:33 PM
George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
There will always be bias in free press, from the way the DNC spread fake news about Bernie during the primaries, and the way the Dems are complaining about Russia and Wikileaks influence in the general election.
We agree that there will always be bias in the press. Most newspapers are quite explicit about their editorial views and endorsements. This aspect of the printed news has never been a problem for voters.

Radio and TV are another story. These news media are not covered by the First Amendment and, because federal license is required, came under the FCC which viewed licensed broadcasters as a public utility, required to be impartial or open to all points of view under the Fairness Doctrine. The Reagan administration struck down the Fairness Doctrine and gave rise to shrill and increasingly partisan radio and TV programming.

The original meaning of "free press" was a press open to all points of view. That has been lost and with it the provision of necessary information needed for citizens in a democracy.
And what about Facebook, Twitter, the whole internet? Should those not be covered by the 1st Amendment either?
"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

http://journalism.about.com/od/ethicsprofessionalism/a/firstamen.htm

As for the internet, this is the part the constitution that's needs to be updated. But it is freedom of speech!!!

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Freedom+of+Speech :usa: Sammy


Edited by wilmywood8455, Feb 9 2017, 08:39 AM.
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Sammy
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MEET THE PRESS,

Five Key Reasons Why Newspapers Are Failing

Bill Wyman Aug 12, 2009, 07:38AM

.....and why they don’t get talked about much.


Journalists are pretty good at working the scene of a disaster. They’ll tell you what happened, who did it, and why.

But when it comes to the disaster engulfing their own profession, their analysis is less rigorous. An uncharacteristic haze characterizes a lot of the reporting and commentary on the current crisis of the industry.

It could have been brought on by delicacy, perhaps romanticism. And since it is not just any crisis, but a definitive one—one that seems to mean an end to the physical papers’ role in American life as we have come to know it—perhaps there’s a little bit of shell-shock in the mix as well.

Whatever the reasons, I can think of five key aspects of the industry collapse that don’t get talked about much.


http://www.splicetoday.com/politics-and-media/five-key-reasons-why-newspapers-are-failing





Brian Williams: My 'ego' caused me to make things up!

NBC's Brian Williams, in his first interview since being suspended in February, said "ego" drove him to embellish stories about his reporting experiences.

"I said things that weren't true," he told his colleague Matt Lauer in a taped interview on NBC's "Today" show.



Exaggerations -- like one that put him on a helicopter that was forced down by enemy fire in Iraq, when in fact he was on a different chopper -- "came from clearly a bad place, a bad urge inside me," he said. "This was clearly ego driven, the desire to better my role in a story I was already in."

http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/19/media/brian-williams-nbc-speaks-on-today-show/index.html




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Sammy
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Independence :biggrin: Sammy

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George Aligator
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Eddo36
Jan 22 2017, 03:09 PM
George Aligator
Jan 21 2017, 03:22 PM
Eddo36
Jan 20 2017, 09:33 PM
George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
There will always be bias in free press, from the way the DNC spread fake news about Bernie during the primaries, and the way the Dems are complaining about Russia and Wikileaks influence in the general election.
We agree that there will always be bias in the press. Most newspapers are quite explicit about their editorial views and endorsements. This aspect of the printed news has never been a problem for voters.

Radio and TV are another story. These news media are not covered by the First Amendment and, because federal license is required, came under the FCC which viewed licensed broadcasters as a public utility, required to be impartial or open to all points of view under the Fairness Doctrine. The Reagan administration struck down the Fairness Doctrine and gave rise to shrill and increasingly partisan radio and TV programming.

The original meaning of "free press" was a press open to all points of view. That has been lost and with it the provision of necessary information needed for citizens in a democracy.
And what about Facebook, Twitter, the whole internet? Should those not be covered by the 1st Amendment either?
The press has consistently been interpreted by SCOTUS to cover printed matter. The airwaves are owned by the American pea pull, the court decided long ago, and so a government license (broadcast license) is needed. The power to license is the power to regulate. Bottom line: First Amendment freedom on the Internet is not unrestricted. It is surprising how many of our conservative constitutional scholars are unaware of this fact. Oh, well ...
Death to the enemies among us! Pity is treason
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Sammy
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George Aligator
Mar 5 2017, 11:45 AM
Eddo36
Jan 22 2017, 03:09 PM
George Aligator
Jan 21 2017, 03:22 PM
Eddo36
Jan 20 2017, 09:33 PM
George Aligator
Dec 15 2016, 11:39 AM
Our constitutional democracy demands two extra-governmental components: an effective system of education that serves all citizens, and a free press which provides the necessary information for informed voting decisions.

The crucial necessity of these requirements has been explicitly recognized since the expansion of the franchise to pretty much all white men over 21 in the early 19th century. Recognized, but not well fulfilled. Our public schools have often been inadequate and our public prints disgraceful. As a result, our democracy has largely been a sham manipulated by an oligarchy and slathered over with exaggerated self-praise.

There is no more glaring product of this sad state of affairs than our necrotic two-party system and its failure to meet the needs of voters, whose roots which go back to deep within the Constitution itself. While Europe underwent major democratic reforms in the second half of the 19th century, America sunk into the corrupt depths of Jim Crow and the Robber Barons. We have nothing to brag about.
There will always be bias in free press, from the way the DNC spread fake news about Bernie during the primaries, and the way the Dems are complaining about Russia and Wikileaks influence in the general election.
We agree that there will always be bias in the press. Most newspapers are quite explicit about their editorial views and endorsements. This aspect of the printed news has never been a problem for voters.

Radio and TV are another story. These news media are not covered by the First Amendment and, because federal license is required, came under the FCC which viewed licensed broadcasters as a public utility, required to be impartial or open to all points of view under the Fairness Doctrine. The Reagan administration struck down the Fairness Doctrine and gave rise to shrill and increasingly partisan radio and TV programming.

The original meaning of "free press" was a press open to all points of view. That has been lost and with it the provision of necessary information needed for citizens in a democracy.
And what about Facebook, Twitter, the whole internet? Should those not be covered by the 1st Amendment either?
The press has consistently been interpreted by SCOTUS to cover printed matter. The airwaves are owned by the American pea pull, the court decided long ago, and so a government license (broadcast license) is needed. The power to license is the power to regulate. Bottom line: First Amendment freedom on the Internet is not unrestricted. It is surprising how many of our conservative constitutional scholars are unaware of this fact. Oh, well ...


Hi George, Believe we cover that at post Feb 8 2017, 01:37 AM :popcorn: Sammy



"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

http://journalism.about.com/od/ethicsprofessionalism/a/firstamen.htm

As for the internet, this is the part the constitution that's needs to be updated. But it is freedom of speech!!!

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Freedom+of+Speech :usa: Sammy
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