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Live, long and black giant shipworm found in Philippines
Topic Started: Apr 18 2017, 01:17 PM (306 Views)
mysysail
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Global_Hick
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-39626131
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mysysail
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Global_Hick
Scientists have found live specimens of the rare giant shipworm for the first time, in the Philippines.

Details of the creature, which can reach up to 1.55m (5ft) in length and 6cm (2.3in) in diameter, were published in a US science journal.

The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on.

Though its existence has been known for years, no living specimen had been studied until now.

Despite its name, the giant shipworm is actually a bivalve - the same group as clams and mussels.

The "rare and enigmatic species", also known as Kuphus polythamia, is the longest living bivalve known to man, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

The strange shells have been found for centuries, because they are "very sturdy and they last a long time," said Daniel Distel, the report's chief author. "But we've never known where to find them."
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George Aligator
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mysysail
Apr 18 2017, 01:21 PM
Scientists have found live specimens of the rare giant shipworm for the first time, in the Philippines.

Details of the creature, which can reach up to 1.55m (5ft) in length and 6cm (2.3in) in diameter, were published in a US science journal.

The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on.

Though its existence has been known for years, no living specimen had been studied until now.

Despite its name, the giant shipworm is actually a bivalve - the same group as clams and mussels.

The "rare and enigmatic species", also known as Kuphus polythamia, is the longest living bivalve known to man, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

The strange shells have been found for centuries, because they are "very sturdy and they last a long time," said Daniel Distel, the report's chief author. "But we've never known where to find them."
The conservative movement that has swept Europe and the USA appears to have at last reached the Philippines: The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on. Strong defense, conservative orientation and a taste for mud should give the new species the same political edge enjoyed by Trump supporters here in God's Country.
I do not respond to memes
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Demagogue
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George Aligator
Apr 18 2017, 01:42 PM
mysysail
Apr 18 2017, 01:21 PM
Scientists have found live specimens of the rare giant shipworm for the first time, in the Philippines.

Details of the creature, which can reach up to 1.55m (5ft) in length and 6cm (2.3in) in diameter, were published in a US science journal.

The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on.

Though its existence has been known for years, no living specimen had been studied until now.

Despite its name, the giant shipworm is actually a bivalve - the same group as clams and mussels.

The "rare and enigmatic species", also known as Kuphus polythamia, is the longest living bivalve known to man, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

The strange shells have been found for centuries, because they are "very sturdy and they last a long time," said Daniel Distel, the report's chief author. "But we've never known where to find them."
The conservative movement that has swept Europe and the USA appears to have at last reached the Philippines: The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on. Strong defense, conservative orientation and a taste for mud should give the new species the same political edge enjoyed by Trump supporters here in God's Country.
Hmm, I detect a snarky comment here on the Civil debate board where all responses are supposed to be about the topic at hand in addition to be non-offensive. You have crossed that line.

I suggest you repent.
Edited by Demagogue, Apr 18 2017, 02:19 PM.
People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would do them harm.
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clone
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Demagogue
Apr 18 2017, 02:16 PM
George Aligator
Apr 18 2017, 01:42 PM
mysysail
Apr 18 2017, 01:21 PM
Scientists have found live specimens of the rare giant shipworm for the first time, in the Philippines.

Details of the creature, which can reach up to 1.55m (5ft) in length and 6cm (2.3in) in diameter, were published in a US science journal.

The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on.

Though its existence has been known for years, no living specimen had been studied until now.

Despite its name, the giant shipworm is actually a bivalve - the same group as clams and mussels.

The "rare and enigmatic species", also known as Kuphus polythamia, is the longest living bivalve known to man, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

The strange shells have been found for centuries, because they are "very sturdy and they last a long time," said Daniel Distel, the report's chief author. "But we've never known where to find them."
The conservative movement that has swept Europe and the USA appears to have at last reached the Philippines: The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on. Strong defense, conservative orientation and a taste for mud should give the new species the same political edge enjoyed by Trump supporters here in God's Country.
Hmm, I detect a snarky comment here on the Civil debate board where all responses are supposed to be about the topic at hand in addition to be non-offensive. You have crossed that line.

I suggest you repent.
Let's cut George some slack
Edited by clone, Apr 20 2017, 04:26 PM.
Right, because you say so...
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George Aligator
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Demagogue
Apr 18 2017, 02:16 PM
George Aligator
Apr 18 2017, 01:42 PM
mysysail
Apr 18 2017, 01:21 PM
Scientists have found live specimens of the rare giant shipworm for the first time, in the Philippines.

Details of the creature, which can reach up to 1.55m (5ft) in length and 6cm (2.3in) in diameter, were published in a US science journal.

The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on.

Though its existence has been known for years, no living specimen had been studied until now.

Despite its name, the giant shipworm is actually a bivalve - the same group as clams and mussels.

The "rare and enigmatic species", also known as Kuphus polythamia, is the longest living bivalve known to man, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

The strange shells have been found for centuries, because they are "very sturdy and they last a long time," said Daniel Distel, the report's chief author. "But we've never known where to find them."
The conservative movement that has swept Europe and the USA appears to have at last reached the Philippines: The giant shipworm spends its life encased in a hard shell, submerged head-down in mud, which it feeds on. Strong defense, conservative orientation and a taste for mud should give the new species the same political edge enjoyed by Trump supporters here in God's Country.
Hmm, I detect a snarky comment here on the Civil debate board where all responses are supposed to be about the topic at hand in addition to be non-offensive. You have crossed that line.

I suggest you repent.
You are correct. I should not have posted this snarky comment on this board. I apologize and I repent.
I do not respond to memes
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