Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Perspectives. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Anheuser-Busch orders 800 hydrogen-powered semi trucks from Tesla rival Nikola
Topic Started: May 7 2018, 07:11 AM (1,492 Views)
RaiderNation
Member Avatar

Anheuser-Busch has a long history of finding creative ways to move beer. It was the first company to use refrigerated rail cars in the 1870s. Much more recently, it shipped 50,000 cases of beer 120 miles using a self-driving semi truck.

Today it announced an order for up to 800 semi trucks powered by hydrogen gas as part of a bid to make its entire fleet of long-haul trucks run on "clean energy."

The hydrogen trucks are being built by Nikola Motor Company. The name Nikola just happens to be the first name of Nikola Tesla, the same Serbiain-born inventor the Tesla (TSLA) car company is named after.

Last year, Anheuser-Busch placed an order for 40 Tesla plug-in semi trucks.

The two companies weren't originally competitors, until Tesla unveiled its entry into the semi business in November, 2017. Nikola recently filed suit against Tesla accusing the carmaker of stealing Nikola's designs. Tesla has publicly denied the charge.

http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/03/technology/anheuser-busch-nikola-trucks/index.html
Will Munny: "Deserve's got nothin' to do with it..."
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
freightshaker

Nothing like driving with a bomb on your truck, no thanks.
In ancient times cats were worshiped as gods; they have not forgotten this.
Terry Pratchett
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
_g R_
Member Avatar

Posted Image

Posted Image
" When we amplify everything ,we hear nothing."
Jon Stewart
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
freightshaker

Actually, most truck fires today are caused by the DEF emissions control system. While it effectively cleans the exhaust, the truck I'm driving now has 450,000 miles on it, and the inside of the stacks are as nearly as clean as the day it rolled off the line, the process also raises exhaust temps to around 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit. And it all takes place in an area underneath the right side of the cab on most trucks. All it takes is a missing piece of heat shield or heat wrap, and you have a bonfire.
Hydrogen burns cleaner, but it's also a highly explosive gas under pressure. The trucks that I have seen running CNG have the tanks mounted behind the cab, not the best place, IMO, but probably the least dangerous place. And tanks, and all the paraphernalia it takes to make the system work, adds weight. And companies, and drivers if you're on O/O, get paid by how much weight they can put on or in the trailer. You add 3,000 lbs to your empty weight, that 3,000 less you can haul. That adds up quick.
In ancient times cats were worshiped as gods; they have not forgotten this.
Terry Pratchett
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
clone
Member Avatar
Director @ Center for Advanced Memetic Warfare
freightshaker
Jun 12 2018, 06:36 PM
Actually, most truck fires today are caused by the DEF emissions control system. While it effectively cleans the exhaust, the truck I'm driving now has 450,000 miles on it, and the inside of the stacks are as nearly as clean as the day it rolled off the line, the process also raises exhaust temps to around 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit. And it all takes place in an area underneath the right side of the cab on most trucks. All it takes is a missing piece of heat shield or heat wrap, and you have a bonfire.
Hydrogen burns cleaner, but it's also a highly explosive gas under pressure. The trucks that I have seen running CNG have the tanks mounted behind the cab, not the best place, IMO, but probably the least dangerous place. And tanks, and all the paraphernalia it takes to make the system work, adds weight. And companies, and drivers if you're on O/O, get paid by how much weight they can put on or in the trailer. You add 3,000 lbs to your empty weight, that 3,000 less you can haul. That adds up quick.
Thanks for the info freightshaker ....is that an elective option or a mandated option?
Political Correctness is the war on noticing things that are obvious and true.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
70-101
Member Avatar

Tesla will be lucky to provide ten trucks, that company is on the ropes, and will be lucky to survive because it can only fill a fraction of its orders, and may well be refunding more money in customer deposits than the money its making selling new vehicles.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
freightshaker

The DEF system is a Federally mandated emissions system and were first put on trucks in 2012. It's now required on diesel pickup trucks as well. Basically, DEF is purified liquid fertilizer. 32% nitrogen and the rest is water. Prior to 2012, starting in 2008 I believe, they used a "burnout" system, where the soot was collected in a canister, them raw diesel was injected and the soot burned out. You could always tell when one was malfunctioning because it look liked a smoke screen coming from the bottom of the truck. It is illegal to remove the emissions control system, but unless you run into California, they seldom write you up for it, and many small local companies will buy older trucks and remove the system. I've heard rumors that a new system is in development, but haven't seen any specs on it yet.
In ancient times cats were worshiped as gods; they have not forgotten this.
Terry Pratchett
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
RaiderNation
Member Avatar

freightshaker
Jun 23 2018, 10:45 AM
The DEF system is a Federally mandated emissions system and were first put on trucks in 2012. It's now required on diesel pickup trucks as well. Basically, DEF is purified liquid fertilizer. 32% nitrogen and the rest is water. Prior to 2012, starting in 2008 I believe, they used a "burnout" system, where the soot was collected in a canister, them raw diesel was injected and the soot burned out. You could always tell when one was malfunctioning because it look liked a smoke screen coming from the bottom of the truck. It is illegal to remove the emissions control system, but unless you run into California, they seldom write you up for it, and many small local companies will buy older trucks and remove the system. I've heard rumors that a new system is in development, but haven't seen any specs on it yet.
I had a 2008 6.4L Ford F250 with that DPF system. It would blow white out the exhaust when it was cleaning like it was burning ATF. One time I cloud not slow down and had to stay in the throttle and the system overheated and shut off as soon as I got under 5 mph once I got off the highway. I had it towed to a Ford store only to find out that it would restart after about an hour without any repairs/resets. Hated it!

Will Munny: "Deserve's got nothin' to do with it..."
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
freightshaker

With semis, it's an incremental de-rate, depending on the problem with the system. IF you catch soon enough, you can do what is called a parked regen. Takes anywhere from 15 minutes to over an hour to clean the system. A faulty DEF level gauge will cut power 10-25% and if you get to the point where the red stop engine light is on, you are limited to no more than 1,000 RPM and 5 MPH for a set amount of time. That takes a shop to clear out. Worst comes to worst, the computer shuts the truck down and you sit until it's towed to a shop.
In ancient times cats were worshiped as gods; they have not forgotten this.
Terry Pratchett
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
RaiderNation
Member Avatar

I also had a 2013 MBZ Sprinter with a turbo V6 diesel. It had a terrible DEF system that was nothing but trouble. It was repaired 4 times in 100,000 miles. That's when the warranty on the system ran out, so we traded it in for a new 2015 Sprinter with a 2.1L turbo diesel that has 125,000 on it and has been 100% trouble free save for an a/c compressor that failed and was updated for free.
Will Munny: "Deserve's got nothin' to do with it..."
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
« Previous Topic · Automotive · Next Topic »
Add Reply